Wednesday, December 1, 2010

Singer Futura II 920..Questions

(sorry for the pictures, I used my cell phone)


(see computer screen in the background, i'm googling everything futura)

I saw this machine this morning at my local thrift store.  I can never find anything "good" in a thrift store, so I was excited to come across this.  It's heavy and it's metal.  I've always heard those make the best machine.  I couldn't beat the price, so I thought "what the heck, I'll take a chance".  Also, the lady that checked me out said if it don't work she would give me my money back.


(click to see better and HELP me)

It powers on, light bulb works and the motor runs, and the foot powers up and down.
I can't figure out how in the heck to make a bobbin.  The center of the bobbin holes is a cross, and very small, so I can't see what it fits onto.  Luckily there was a bobbin in all the "extras" that had thread on it.  BINGO...we'll see if it works.  NOT....I can't load the bobbin.  Shouldn't I know how to do this?  




I have the old Singer Spartan, but the bobbin loads just like my two brothers.  Yes, now I have 4 machines.  Gosh, I'm loving life!

Okay, back to the problem at hand.  Anyone know how to make a bobbin or load it?  I can buy the manual for $8.00 and I guess that might be what I need to do.


all the extras, loads of stuff here


i'm thinking this is a walking foot?  I don't have one of these for my other machines.

The previous owner has her name etched in the machine on top.  Guess I could look her up on Facebook.  haha


49 comments:

  1. The bobbin winds in the machine. You have to push that white thing with the minus on it.

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  2. What a great find.
    Have you tried to google it and see if you find info that way.
    That does look like a walking foot. Mine sort of looks that way.
    Good luck with figuring it all out.

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  4. http://www.sewusa.com/Threading_Diagrams/Threading_Pages/Singer_Sewing_Machine_Threading/singer_920_futura_threading.htm

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  5. My mother old singe used to wind in the machine I think Tangos is right push the minus button.

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  6. Such a great fine...Lucky you! Wish I could help you, I am clueless.

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  7. That is a walking foot, but the fork piece on the right needs to go over the needle screw - that's what makes it "walk"! Put the needle screw between the two forks.

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  8. Leave the needle threaded and hang on to the tail. Over on the buttons there should be a circle with a dot in the center, that will need pushed after you push the teardrop thingy over top of the bobbin. Step on the footpeddle slowly and keep tension on the tail of the thread you are holding on to. After a few round the tail will break off, if not cut it off when the bobbin is filled.

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  9. It looks like a self winding bobbin to me. Have you tried to push that little white button to the side and then just run the machine. That should do it. I used to have one like that and it really is a great concept - no unthreading the machine.

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  10. That is a walking foot. Wrap the needle thread around the screw on the left to hold the thread. Push or move to the left that button next to the bobbin. Start the power and it should fill up. The bobbin should slide out by lifting it up from the front. I'm on a few singer sites on yahoo, look around for a singer group there. Also google free singer manuals. I use a Singer 648, older than yours and love it.

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  11. I had this machcine and loved it, but eventually wore it out! As another commenter said, you wind the bobbin in the machine by puhing the little tab with the red arrow. Then just run - easiest winding I've ever had.

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  12. I have this machine and love it. Never had any problems and it still runs as good as it did the day I bought it. Nola

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  13. Wow! That was my first machine! The white thing pulls forward to go partially over the bobbin. Then step on the foot pedal and it will wind. I'm pretty sure you wrap the thread around the screw on the foot. After it's wound, the bobbin thread comes forward and under the metal things. Hopefully there are some directions online.

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  14. there is also a yahoo group for vintage singers that you may want to join. they know darn near everything there is to know about them.

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  15. What a GREAT buy, Tonya! I used to have a Singer that allowed me to wind the bobbin in place and I loved that feature. (I didn't have this same machine but one similar to it.) That is a walking foot but the arm does have to be put in the right spot in order for it to do its job properly. Congrats on getting such a wonderful machine!

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  16. Until hubby bought me my Bernina, I always but always had a Singer sewing machine. Real old workhorses they are. What a find. You lucky thing.

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  17. Push the white lever to the right. Use the thread from the needle and wrap it
    aound the screw on the left side of the pressure foot. Press the power foot and the bobbin begins to thread. When you finish, close the plate and use a pair of scissors to pull about 3 inches of the thread towards you. Cut the thread and you are ready to sew.
    Barbara M

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  18. I need help figuring out how to do freehand quilting on the Futura II 920. I have a darning foot but am having trouble figuring out the correct tension. Help

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  19. Wow. What a great find! I had one of these machines for nearly 30 years. It was wonderful, and a real workhorse. I made most of my own clothing on this machine, along with many store samples for Joann fabrics back in the 70's. I wish I still had this machine. And yes, that is a walking foot, and the bobbin winds in the machine, which was amazing at the time!

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  20. Wish I had seen this sooner....I have this machine, manual, and everything. I could have helped you. :(

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    1. OMG!!!! Can u hlp me???? I need instuctions on how to use it!!!! ;O I'd mess around with it to find out how to use it buh i litterally am afraid 2 break it! DX S.O.S.!

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    2. Angie, please email me at tonyahmay@aol.com and I'll try and help you.

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    3. hi angie i just found my grandmothers old sewing machine and ive figured out everything except how to back stitch is there a button im missing?

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  21. Pssst... Can you help me with my FuturaII 920??? I dont know how to work it... ;( and i really dont want to be breaking it when my dad kinda just got it for me... I didnt get a mannual or anything.... want to use it soooooo badly! ;P

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    1. Email me and I'll help you, tonyahmay@aol.com

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  22. how old is the futura 11 modle 920 singer sewing machine?

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  23. I have a Singer Futura II 920/925 that was my mothers. I remember she bought it brand new in 1974 when my grandmother died with her inheritance money (it was top of the line back then!) You can download a FREE (US) manual here: http://www.singerco.com/accessories/instruction-manuals/search. I'm getting ready to donate the machine too since I don't use it and have 2 others. Parts for the machine are available for very reasonable prices here: http://www.singeronline.com/singer900920.html Hope this helps anyone who still has one!

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    1. THANK YOU JILL! I recently recieved my Grandmothers machine but there was no manuel. I have not touched a sewing machine in over 15 years but I hope to have some luck getting this one up and running!

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  24. My neighbor just threw out a futura 2 model 925 and I asked if ai could keep it. I guess its from 1975. No accessories came with it other than the locking cover power cord and foot pedal...all seems to work.

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  25. I just bought one on ebay, so we will see.

    Addicted to Sew.

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    1. I own 4 of them, best machines they ever made. I find them at estate sales. I have one for this and one that works better for that. Haa! I am a professional seamstress that does not do alterations. I can't stand the cheap new machines, even the ones that cost thousands of dollars. This does everything you need. Forget the sergers, you need to buy 5 or more spools of thread for one project. Ridiculous! This works fine for me. Take it from a pro, it is how you sew! Period! You don't need half the gadgets the other machines have. I make gorgeous things with the good old Futura 11, 920's. The best, I just make my own adjustments and they are very reliable to say the least. Very speedy settings too. You have a choice, slow or fast. All metal parts - can't beat them. I always tell people all you need is a good straight, zigzag, button hole making machine period. You can go to town with those. Those fancy stiches make you clothing look ridiculous - you can tell they are handmade. Then those fancy feline models would take you ages and a ton of money to work out all the details they present before you finish your project. A true artist does not rely on a machine that you push a button and walk away from. I hate going to art shows and seeing picture perfect embroidery that they claim they made. They should be forbidden to enter the shows. Years ago I was the only seamstress permitted into the art shows that were juried. My work was original and truly handmade. This is what they need to get back to. If I wanted a store bought look, I will go to the store not the art show. I don't know about you, but I want to see true art work come back to life again. And those goes for those wood workers that claim they make their own wood pieces. Not! Well I have vented enough for today, have a good one and happy stitching!

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  26. I just bought one on ebay. I doubt it runs as smoothly as my Elna or Juki, but they sure are fun. I have 12 singer machines beginning with a model 66 from 1910 which belonged to my great auntie.

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    1. I never figured this one out. I donated it to our church rummage sell. ;)

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  27. Hi Tonya,

    Just like you, I got mine yesterday at the thrift store and now trying to make it work...

    If you have any piece of info that could help I'd be grateful! Thank you...

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    1. I gave up on that machine and donated it. :(

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  28. This is the machine I received for HS graduation in 1976. Mine had issues with the tension so I traded it in for a Viking a few years later. I still miss that buttonhole attachment! Best thing ever!

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    1. Yes, I wish I could have figured out that machine. :(

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    2. The Singer Touch N Sew 756 is a good one and Merritt 6620 and others.. There is a Singer Touch n Sew 771 that is a nice one, too

      I was reading about 920.. Don't know much about it. The way that it winds is different some than Touch n Sew. Vicki

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  29. To wind bobbin first thread machine, then wrap thread under presser foot and around the screw that holds the presser foot in place. Open bobbin compartment all the way, put in empty bobbin and push lever with red arrow to the center above the bobbin. Use slow speed to wind and don't fill past the outside line on the bobbin. Just push the power pedal and your bobbin will fill. Put the stitch on straight stitch first though. When filled just pull out the thread and cut in half or you can just start sewing.

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  30. I've had mine since '78, and I love it. If you aren't satisfied with the way it runs, do take it to the shop. About $100, but it's worth it since you cannot buy a machine of this quality these days . . . at least not affordablle.

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  31. Yes, the stainless steel sewing foot that has more width has helped me. Also, I use Touch N Sew bobbins, 15j, and 66. The better cotton thread also. I like the Singer 756, 750, 626 and for the newer 7258 is nice.. Curvy seems to be a better one and 7470 seems ok.. Singer Athena 2210 is nice for the 1980's. I has the 66 bobbin. 15J is a nice newer kind of bobbin. Singer Merritt 6000 and others are nice also. Vick

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  32. I have a Futura Sewing Machine that I bought many years ago. I saw where you can get a manual on-line for the machine if you don't have one. Just put in Futura Sewing Machine Manual.
    I hope you enjoy your machine as much as I have mine. Good Luck!

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  33. my future 2 machine does not have a metal feeder with teeth. It is made of smooth rubber and does not feed the material good at all. I bought this machine new so the machine came with this, I have never seen another machine like it. They all have metak toothed feeders. The material does not feed thru my machine good. I have to pull as it feeds. Does anyone else with this machine have the rubber feeder and if so do you have the sae problem. Where can I get a netal feeder...ty

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    1. I also have this problem.. it is a real pain in the butt! I was hoping there would be some replacement for them. Have you found any solution?

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  34. To Anonymous above--you need to buy new feed dogs for your Futura II. The rubber degrades over the years and it's easy to replace the feed dogs with just 2 screws. You can order the parts online. You can put metal feed dogs on if you want, but some of the stitches won't work right unless you use the original rubberized feed dogs. There are several small parts that need to be replaced on all Athena 2000s and Futura II 920s. The motor mount and bushings, bobbin winder lift cam and main shaft washer need to be replaced, plus new feed dogs and foam for the spool cap and seat. Anyone who is handy can do it and then they run like new. The Futura II 920 has a 1.3 amp motor and the Athena 2000 has 1.5 amps. These Singers are very worth restoring and maintaining. Tri-Flow liquid and gear grease make all the difference.

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  35. Hello, Futura II 920 owners: FYI, there are several small, but very important parts that must be replaced as a matter of basic maintenance. The motor mount and 2 bushings are 3 small plastic parts that turn into broken orange shards. These parts are necessary to keep the motor from vibrating against the frame. The bobbin winder lift cam is another small part that is easy to replace--it always eventually breaks in half and then bobbins don't wind anymore. New rubberized feed dogs are easy to replace and you need to put a new fiber washer on the upper main shaft (a fondue fork works.) There are 2 versions of 920's and one is 'transitional' with adjustable feed dogs. 920's need to be properly lubricated with Tri-Flow and, after 40 years, they need a few inexpensive parts, which anyone who is reasonably handy can install. 920s sew some valuable stitches that vintage Kenmores, ie 1914, etc. cannot do. I wouldn't ask a 920 to sew super heavy upholstery, but they are very fun for garment-making and daily use.

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  36. I have read, at least for other Singer machines, the rubber feed dogs did not last long, and did not perform as well as 'expected.' (Don't you just love being a guinea pick for Marketing Idiots!?) For the other machines I am referring to, Singer sell NON-rubber feed dogs, i.e., metal feed dogs. On those other machines, it is a minor, 3-minute swap. Hopefully it will be the same here...

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  37. You can go to www.singer.com and download the manual. I have the Singer Futura 925 which I purchased at a discounted price in 1978 since it was a store demo - $423.95 - just saw my receipt today that was taped inside the manual. I believe the electronic models came out the next year. It was a top of the line machine when it was new, and I've been using it ever since. While I don't sew regularly any more, I've made my fair share of pinch pleated draperies, bed skirts, and other home dec items. The machine is still going strong, will even sew through leather. I suppose it will go to my grave with me!

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